Creative Uses for Lower Thirds in eLearning Videos

We have all kinds of eLearning video supplements in our eLearning library. Dive into our library and you’ll find loads of audio such as sound effects, editable soundtracks, and background music. You’ll also discover a gigantic stock video library with everything from cityscapes to hospital workers to the space shuttle. These can all be used to add attractive and attention grabbing elements to your eLearning video.

If you’re an Adobe After Effects user you’ll also find loads of lower thirds graphics in our video library. If you’re a Camtasia user you’ll find lower thirds graphics in the Overlays section of the Camtasia Templates Library. These graphics can be used in a plethora of ways.

As a default lower third

Above, an example of placing the lower third right onto your video the way it’s been designed. This normally slides on, stands for a few seconds, and then slides away. This can be great in adding a name tag or job title to an interview. The lower third template we used for this was from the Clean Green theme.

To create a list

While not typical for a lower third graphic, using lower thirds like this can definitely end up looking great. If you’re not finding exactly what you need in a layout template, you can build your own using lower thirds graphics that are quite nice! This one is from the Pulse theme.

To pop up useful information

Not only can you use lower thirds to give a name and title to a person, you can also use them to give a name and title to a video or event. Keep in mind that you can place a subtitle on just about any lower third graphic. The one demonstrated above is from the Bright theme.

To pop down useful information

Some situations may not allow for a “lower” third, and so you may be tempted to make it an “upper” third. This isn’t always bad, but you do need to make sure it isn’t blocking a person’s eyes, forehead, or other piece of important information. For the pop down graphic we used the lower third from the Jelly theme.

Depending on your framing you may want to try reversing the side your directional lower third pops on to, or using a centered lower third graphic.

This is a great example of a lower third that just doesn’t seem to work with the video content. We can try flipping the graphic 180 degrees to see if that solves the problem.

But this doesn’t seem to work either. Even shrinking the graphic a little can’t get rid of the way it looks like Mr. Aldrin is eating it.

Placing the lower third over another shot would be best, but in a pinch a center graphic does work best for this sort of scenario. This graphic is from the Tech theme.

As you work with your lower thirds and begin to think creatively you’ll find your eye will push you in the right direction. Trust your gut, and have fun!

Visit our library to check out all the lower thirds available to you!

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