eLearning

Today’s learners are presented with hundreds of things to do and hundreds of decisions to make each day. Breaking through the information overload can be tough when you’re trying to promote your courses to learners. While the adage, “Build it and they will come” may be true for a baseball field, it doesn’t work the same way for eLearning.

Don’t despair – we have five suggestions for how you can keep your learning top of mind and make sure that when you design it, they will enroll.

Advertise your courses.

Learners don’t know what they don’t know. And if you’re not advertising your courses – on banner ads, on the intranet, or in the learning management system, they may not even be aware that your course is available. Look for innovative ways, as well as old school tactics (posters and email alerts, anyone?), to notify your audience that training is available.

Incorporate courses into a curriculum.

If your courses are getting lost in the shuffle, consider creating a curriculum. Or, find an existing program into which you can incorporate your relevant course(s). Sometimes the structure and format of a series of courses is all the encouragement a learner needs to add a course to their to-do list.

Create competition among learners.

If employees aren’t selecting your courses, try to generate interest by adding a competitive element, like a game, to course enrollment or completion. Maybe the first learner who gets all the answers right, or who completes the course before everyone else, wins a prize. If learners are starting the course but never reaching the end, create an incentive (e.g., prizes or awards) to get them to the finish line.

Inform managers about your content.

Managers are responsible for employee development, but they can’t recommend that their employees take your course it if they don’t it’s available. Make sure you’re providing information about any new courses, as well as existing courses, to managers. Make it easy for them to understand course objectives, format, and time required. They’ll be grateful to have your courses as a professional development resource they can offer to their team.

Share testimonials from other learners.

If you don’t collect feedback at the end of your eLearning modules, now is the time to start. Feedback helps inform your design and positive feedback can serve as a testimonial about your course. How did completing your course help an employee learn a new skill? Was your course rated five stars out of five? How many employees have completed the course since it was launched? The power of sharing what other learners say about your course can’t be ignored—testimonials are one of the best ways to get learners interested in your content.

You don’t have to get a degree in marketing in order to promote your eLearning courses. But if you want to ensure that learners are engaging with your content, it’s a good idea to put some time and effort into making sure they know what’s available.

LizSheffieldBioLiz Sheffield is a freelance writer with a background in training and development. She specializes in writing about everything related to the human side of business. You can contact her via LinkedIn or Twitter.

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